Beside Canberra's lake beneath the trees 21st Floriade dances in the breeze

October 08, 2008
Beside Canberra's lake beneath the trees 21st Floriade dances in the breeze

Organisers are pleased by the turnout so far in Canberra to both Floriade and the new Floriade NightFest.

More than a million bulbs and annuals are used every year at Floriade, Australias biggest floral show.

The Floriade garden beds span 10,668 square metres. Floriade showcases new bulb varieties. Exotic sounding varieties like Tulipa Black Diamond, Violetta Tiny Tots Blueberry Banana and Tulipa Top Parrot.

The bulbs and annuals are planted in autumn each year, ensuring there is always great colour throughout the 30-day event.

Different flowers bloom at different times. Colours constantly change as the different plants come into flower.

Over the years Floriade has evolved to become Canberras flagship event.

Floriade started in 1986 when two members of the ACT Parks and Conservation Service envisioned a floral display for the celebration of the 1988 bicentenary and Canberra's 75th birthday.

Their inspiration was the annual Dutch Keukenhof flower display and Hollands Floriade which happens every 10 years.

A mix of flowers, predominantly bulbs create the kaleidoscope of colours that set the backdrop to Floriade. Some of the blooms include tulips, irises, daffodils, hyacinths, violas, chrysanthemums, ranunculas and daisies.

The ABC reports today that the 21st Floriade has been inspired by films that shaped our nation.

An on-site cinema screens rare footage from the National Film and Sound Archive. Floriade 21 features live entertainment, local food and wine, and arts and craft stalls.

Films that Made Australia is the theme
Films that Made Australia is the theme

The Canberra Times reported today that ACT Tourism Minister Andrew Barr met the owner of the famous Australia Fair street organ to persaude him not to leave Floriade Australia biggest floral festival early after a dispute with the event management. Added security for the organ was offered.

This follows reports that the organ was slightly damaged during a break-in last Saturday night.

The organ's owner, Rick Alabaster, told The Canberra Times he was ready to leave Floriade to return home to Melbourne five days before the event was due to finish.

For more information on Floriade in the City and film program, visit www.inthecitycanberra.com.au. Floriade runs until October 12 at Commonwealth Park, Canberra.

Editor's Note: Also See -

The Australia Fair Street organ
The Australia Fair Street organ
Bonsai is an art form
Bonsai is an art form
Beside the lake beneath the trees Floriade dances in the breeze
Beside the lake beneath the trees Floriade dances in the breeze
Cabins take on a new face
Cabins take on a new face
Waves of floral beauty
Waves of floral beauty