New Zealand's iconic Te Puia binds threads of Maori culture for future generations

May 29, 2009
New Zealand's iconic Te Puia binds threads of Maori culture for future generations

New Zealand's most recognised tourism attraction Te Puia at Rotorua launches a new website today. The core of Te Puia is the powerful, boiling earth energy of the Whakarewarewa Valley. www.tepuia.com

For about 700 years its people have been nourished by geothermal gods. Today the legacy of the past generations is knowledge and history handed on in stories and song.

In 1963 the NZ government framed legislation to set up the New Zealand Maori Arts and Crafts Institute to foster and protect the customary art forms of Maori.

Carving, weaving, kapa haka (Maori performing arts) have been taught and cemented for the future with hundreds of artists.

Te Puia numbers its visitors in millions and it funds itself through their interest in what it represents and teaches.

New Zealand's most recognised tourism attraction is founded on the fiery, steaming, hissing, bubbling wonders of Te Whakarewarewa Geothermal Valley.

Many of the staff and the guides who lead visitors through New Zealand's iconic Maori experience are direct descendants of the first people to settle in the Whakarewarewa Valley.

They continue traditions of guiding and hospitality to New Zealand and international visitors which go back about 120 years.

In that process the early guides helped raise the world's knowledge and appreciation of the Maori culture.

These are the threads that bind the fabric of Te Puia and fit it for its role as Kaitiaki (guardian) of Maori culture for future generations.

As guardian of this treasure, Te Puia protects the culture for future generations and sustains it through its schools of learning and visitor experiences. Te Puia shares Maori traditions and their importance with people from all over the world.

Editors Note: Also See -

Te Puia war canoe. GoSeeNZ pic
Te Puia war canoe. GoSeeNZ pic
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